Vaporizing Sulfides Make Meteors Structurally Weak

Scientists analyzed what happened when two meteorite fragments were heated up to atmospheric re-entry temperatures and found voids in the samples.

A team of scientists at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign analyzed what happened to two meteor fragments from different meteorites as they were heated up to the temperature experienced during Earth’s re-entry. They found that lucky for life on Earth, the heating vaporized a particular type of…

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Planetary scientist, podcast host. Communication specialist for SETI Institute and Planetary Science Institute. Journalist on the Weekly Space Hangout.

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Beth Johnson

Beth Johnson

Planetary scientist, podcast host. Communication specialist for SETI Institute and Planetary Science Institute. Journalist on the Weekly Space Hangout.

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