Using Ambient Noise to Track Magma Migration

Using ambient noise from waves and wind, scientists have found a novel way to understand how magma flows underground in relation to a caldera.

IMAGE: For the first time ever, researchers used seismic noise to observe the movement of volcanic material at depth. CREDIT: Elisabetta Cipolla

Back here on Earth, we’re once again held captive and fascinated by the power and awesomeness of volcanoes. I don’t think we can overstate the love that…

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Planetary scientist, podcast host. Communication specialist for SETI Institute and Planetary Science Institute. Journalist on the Weekly Space Hangout.

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Beth Johnson

Beth Johnson

Planetary scientist, podcast host. Communication specialist for SETI Institute and Planetary Science Institute. Journalist on the Weekly Space Hangout.

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