Innovations in the Search for Life Beyond Earth

NASA JPL is developing a new suite of instruments to ingest and analyze liquid samples, and a team of scientists thinks that they can use nitrous oxide as a biosignature.

Beth Johnson

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IMAGE: JPL’s OWLS combines powerful chemical-analysis instruments that look for the building blocks of life with microscopes that search for cells. This version of OWLS would be miniaturized and customized for use on future missions. CREDIT: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The search for life beyond Earth is one of the more fascinating scientific endeavors currently underway. Without a way to place robots or humans on distant worlds both within and outside our solar system, scientists have been working to come up with methods that will work from a distance.

First up, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been developing a new suite of instruments called OWLS or the Ocean Worlds Life Surveyor. The system is “designed to ingest and analyze liquid samples” using eight separate instruments, potentially from an erupting vapor plume such as those seen at Saturn’s moon Enceladus or Jupiter’s moon Europa. Co-principal investigator Peter Willis notes: We wanted to create the most powerful instrument system you could design for that situation to look for both chemical and biological signs of life.

After working on OWLS for almost five years, the science team tested the equipment on the very salty water of Mono Lake in Califonia. The software found chemical and cellular evidence of life, without human…

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Beth Johnson

Planetary scientist, podcast host. Communication specialist for SETI Institute and Planetary Science Institute. Buy me a coffee: https://ko-fi.com/planetarypan