Former Planet Ceres Moved to Asteroid Belt

In trying to understand why Ceres’ misty exosphere contains ammonia, simulations find that the dwarf planet formed past Saturn and moved inward.

IMAGE: Approximate true-color image of Ceres, using the F7 (‘red’), F2 (‘green’) and F8 (‘blue’) filters, projected onto a clear filter image. CREDIT: NASA / JPL-Caltech / UCLA / MPS / DLR / IDA / Justin Cowart

Where you are in the solar system changes just how much of an effect the Sun has on you. For Earth, the Sun can cause bright aurorae that can extend…

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Planetary scientist, podcast host. Communication specialist for SETI Institute and Planetary Science Institute. Journalist on the Weekly Space Hangout.

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Beth Johnson

Beth Johnson

Planetary scientist, podcast host. Communication specialist for SETI Institute and Planetary Science Institute. Journalist on the Weekly Space Hangout.

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